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  1. In technical applications and markets with high requirement profile, such as electronics products, transportation or even the construction sector, bioplastics have so far hardly been represented to any significant extent. Besides economic aspects main reasons for this are inadequate properties for technical products. Therefore the material properties play an important role in its market success for technical applications. For example, plastics for technical products usually have to meet a whole series of minimum requirements, such as high heat resistance, high toughness and low flammability. Bioplastics, such as polylactic acid (PLA), do not fulfill these requirements. Despite intensive research and development in recent years, PLA still does not have a marketable property profile for technical injection molding products. In a research project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, the Fraunhofer Institute UMSICHT, together with Evonik Operations GmbH, the Institute for Plastics Processing at RWTH Aachen (IKV) and FKuR Kunststoff GmbH, was able to develop formulations with simultaneously improved impact strength, heat resistance and flame retardancy. In addition to material development, the processing parameters were investigated, to reach an economic manufacturing process via injection molding. The research consortium was able to identify important cause-effect relationships and corresponding materials were produced on an industrial scale. The property profile of the developed materials ranges from heat deflection temperatures above 100 °C, charpy impact strength of over 50 kJ/m2 and a flame retardancy category V0 in the UL 94 test. Through targeted additives and the adjustment of the crystallization behavior of the PLA-based materials, it was possible to produce real components in cooperation with partners from the electronics industry. 
    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction
    Chemical recycling via pyrolysis of plastic waste is gaining a lot of attention with a number of projects announced globally and is seen as critical in enabling the brand owners to live up to their pledges for recycled content. Though this solution is considered to help both with plastic waste management and contributing to decrease GHG emissions, several challenges are standing in the way of a successful and large-scale implementation. 
    Challenges come from inherent plastic properties (such as chlorine in PVC) as well as impurities from municipal solid waste – both incompatible with steam crackers. Furthermore, steam crackers can have very different feedstock specifications when it comes to end boiling point, nitrogen content, concentration of halogens, etc. 
    This presentation will address typical technical challenges when upgrading pyrolysis oils and how to solve them through tailored solution approach deployed commercially.
    The commercial deployment side will be addressed through analysis of possible scenarios for the developing market, in which a lot yet needs to happen. The good news is that a lot of the existing capacity can be used and/or repurposed, such as refineries and steam crackers, and though the look of the value chain of the future is uncertain, collaboration is vibrant and synergies abundant.
     
    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction

    Xampla is a BCorp Cambridge University spin-out which has created the world’s first entirely natural replacement for plastic made from plant proteins, such as pea-protein. The material performs just like synthetic polymers, but decomposes naturally and fully without harming the environment.
    Xampla’s plant protein-based material has been developed through more than 15 years’ research at the University of Cambridge. The academic research has moved on to develop technologies using this material for the packaging industry, the food & drink industry and agriculture.
    This presentation will be delivered by Simon Hombersley, CEO of Xampla and will explore the opportunities that are available with 100 percent plant based polymers for brands looking to switch from traditional plastics. A successful cleantech entrepreneur, Simon is well placed to discuss the journey from start-up to scale up, reflecting on the lessons Xampla has learnt and where it will go over the next 12-months to bring its innovative material to a large consumer base.
    Xampla’s core technology is created from naturally occurring polymers and is handled and processed with no chemical modification, making it high performance and seamlessly biodegradable – thus if it ends up in the environment it causes no harm. This presents a significant opportunity for brands to replace their single-use packaging with something that offers the same benefits without harming the environment. 
    It is Xampla’s core mission to eliminate the most polluting single-use plastics for the sake of our ocean’s health, and this presentation will also explore how this material can be used in a variety of markets and applications, bringing something not only new to the market, but something completely natural that brands and consumers have been seeking. This is not only significant for brands, but also for the development and innovation of products.
    This presentation seeks to share how commonly used single-use plastics and microplastics can be replaced with like-for-like alternatives that fit with existing processes and equipment used by industry, and how it is possible to create plastic technology that will home compost, and even break down in the natural environment, as a safe solution for the Earth’s soils and seas.
    We will also cover examples of how these materials have been used with major global brands. These include Xampla’s recent announcement that it is partnering with Britvic to further develop its material to hold nutrients within liquids as well as creating the world’s first edible stock cube wrapper made from pea protein developed for meal kit retailer Gousto, which has the potential to replace 17 tonnes of plastic annually, if rolled out at scale.  
    The presentation will also include powerful visuals of Xampla’s polymers and materials and the opportunity this presents for industry, consumers and the planet.

    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction
    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction
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    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction
    The panel discussion will highlight through a case study how a plastic value chain actor can take action and generate a positive environmental impact by measuring its plastic footprint, managing plastic pollution within its value chain, and financing plastic waste collection and recycling infrastructure through plastic credits. First the panel will walk the audience through the process of accounting for plastic usage and environmental leakage throughout a supply chain. Second the panel will discuss the mitigation hierarchy and how action starts by first addressing hotspots within the value chain. Finally, the panel will present how plastic credits and the partnership with M & Mme Recyclage is driving financing to local recycling activities in South Western France
    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction
    Stora Enso has developed a digital platform that enables collaboration and reduces the cost and complexity of developing circular value chains. We will present the results of our pilot testing of the platform and plans to launch and expand this with the circular economy for plastics in Europe. The pilot version of the platform can be found here: https://kind-island-01de16203.1.azurestaticapps.net/
    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction
    Trinseo will discuss how a plastics manufacturer transforms toward circularity. With the evolvement in the marketplace on sustainable products and consumer perceptions, the business model of the plastics manufacturers is evolving, including upward and downward integration or collaborations - developing and securing sustainable feedstocks, expanding sustainable product portfolios, utilizing scientific tools, decarbonization and innovative product design. Most importantly, concerted efforts among value chain partners are critical as circularity can only be achieved through collaborations.
    • Sustainable Materials for Manufacturing & Construction